Cellular Sales Donates to Program to Build Stronger Non-Profits

Cellular Sales is proud to announce we have made a $24,000 donation in scholarship funds to the inaugural class of the OnBoard program, a joint venture between the University Of Tennessee Haslam College Of Business and the Alliance for Better Non-Profits (ABN).

What is it?

OnBoard is a program that aims to educate mid-career professionals on how to effectively serve on the boards of non-profit organizations. The six-class course provides training in areas such as a board’s role in non-profits, strategic planning, fundraising, governance and more. At the conclusion of the course, the graduates of the program are introduced to members of the ABN in order to find a board to serve on and apply their new skills.

What’s the importance?

The OnBoard program was originally conceptualized by Chris Martin, the CEO of ABN, and Dr. Alex Miller of the Haslam School of Business, after recognizing a need for better leadership on non-profit boards. Chris Martin spoke about the motivation behind the conceptualization stating, “This is a program that is going to enrich our local community and help fill the boards of local non-profit organizations with well-trained leaders. We know there are lots of professionals in our area who are not engaged at the leadership level of local charities and non-profits.”

OnBoard serves to bridge the gap and provide benefits to everyone involved:

  • The organizations get new, trained leadership.
  • The community will be better served by having more-capable non-profits.
  • The professionals gain valuable leadership training.
  • The companies gain new leaders.

How are we involved?

The inaugural OnBoard consists of 24 professionals, and the program’s cost per person is $2,000. Cellular Sales’ sponsorship of the program covers half the cost of attendance for each individual. Our CEO Dane Scism states, “As a company, we have always been very passionate about giving back to the Knoxville and surrounding communities. We believe OnBoard is a great program that will help make East Tennessee a better place to live by providing impactful leadership to our local charities and non-profits.”

 

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Improving Your Smartphone Privacy

Most of us use our smartphones all day long to listen to music, read books, talk to friends, take pictures, go shopping and much more. It’s an indispensable device. At the same time, we don’t usually take privacy and security as seriously as we would with our house or car. We lock our house and cars and sometimes even use alarms to protect ourselves. We should use the same consideration to protect our phones.

Here are a few tips for keeping your privacy private:

  1. Use an alphanumeric passcode and avoid using your fingerprint.

Using your fingerprint to unlock phone is convenient, but the police can force you to use your fingerprint to unlock your phone. They cannot compel you to give your passcode.

  1. Encrypt your phone.

Most smartphones come encrypted. After iOS 3, iPhones come automatically encrypted and most Androids also come encrypted. In Android, you can check encryption by going to Settings and then Security. Look under Encryption. It will tell you if phone is encrypted or you can follow directions to encrypt phone.

  1. Avoid showing personal information on lock screen.

Both Android and iOS could potentially show private information for the lock screen. In Android, go to Settings and then Notifications. Tap the gear icon at top and then tap lock screen. You have several options including “Hid sensitive notification content” or even “Don’t show notifications.” In iOS, swipe right on lock screen to see widgets. If you see notifications that should be private, tap “edit” at bottom of widgets. Enter passcode, and delete widgets that should be private.

  1. Disable lock screen access features.

In iOS, you may have more features enabled on lock screen then you might realize. When I checked my phone, I saw that I had message reply enabled and few other features that would allow someone to impersonate me without unlocking phone. To check what is enabled on the iOS, go to Settings, Touch ID & Passcode, and find “lock screen access.” From here you can turn off what you will allow access to when your phone is locked.

  1. Location services

Apps may be tracking your location unnecessarily. You should decide who can track location and when. To make adjustments in iOS, go to Setting, Privacy, Location Services, and System Services and turn off Locations. On Android, you should go to Settings, Apps and tap gear icon at top. Tap “app permissions” to adjust permission to things like Calendar, Contacts, Location, and Microphone. If you aren’t sure, it is better not to trust the app.

  1. Two-Step Verification

Many of your accounts like Apple ID, Gmail, Facebook, and more can be set up, requiring two-factor authentication or two-step verification. For help setting two-factor authentication on your accounts, check out instructions for these popular apps.

  1. Find My Phone

The find my phone feature on Android or iOS is up for debate. It will make it easier to find your phone if lost, but it will share data with servers at Google or Apple. On Android, this feature is called Android Device Manager. To turn on go to Settings, Personal, Services, and tap Android Device Manager. On iOS, go to Settings, iCloud, and tap switch beside Find My iPhone.

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Losing Privacy Online and Offline

Most of us realize that many sites we access like Facebook, Instagram, and others, collect information about our usage. At the same time, we freely allow sites access to our personal data while sometimes complaining about our loss of privacy. Experts call this behavior the “privacy paradox.” It may seem like we don’t have any control over our privacy, but we do. There are ways to increase privacy protection as well to learn who is tracking your data.

 

Earlier this year, New York Public Radio’s “Note To Self” podcast launched a series of podcasts on privacy called the Privacy Paradox. These five episodes provide a great snapshot about the challenges for privacy in this day and age. Even if you missed the episodes, you can sign up for Privacy Paradox to receive the five podcasts with helpful tips on securing your personal data.  Also, if you’re interested, you can listen to Teri Gross interview information expert Joseph Turow about how retailers use your data as your walk through the stores.

 

Here are some helpful apps for guarding your privacy when using your smartphone:

 

Brave Browser (iOS, Android)

Now you can automatically block ads and trackers. This keeps you and your information safer by effectively shielding you from 3rd party tracking and malvertisement. Plus, your web browsing speeds will increase by up to 60%.

Signal Private Messenger (iOS, Android)

Protect your text messages and voice calls. Signal is end-to-end encrypted, and no one can read the messages between you and your conversation partner. It also offers access to voice and video calls. This app is open source (developed by Open Whisper Systems) and has been thoroughly examined for security holes and has stood up to auditing.

 

ObscuraCam (Android)

Now you can share photos and videos with friends while also protecting the privacy of specific people in photos. ObscuraCam allows you to blur and disguise faces in your photos and videos. Plus, information that could identify you as the cameraperson is removed from the files for added security.

 

Pixelknot (Android)

You can hide messages sent to your friends in a picture. By entering a certain password, your friends will see the message, but everyone else will just see a picture.

 

Protonmail (iOS, Android)

While Gmail encrypts messages and provides an excellent security option, you may want even greater security. If you send an email to other Protonmail users, they will see the message normally. If you send a message to someone who does not use Protonmail, they’ll be sent a link and will need a password to view the message.

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